Project 100% – How Can We Make the COVID Vaccination Campaign Successful?

Since the last December, COVID vaccines are distributed in Germany to stop the spread of the disease and to reduce the probability of having severe illnesses in case of being infected. After its climax of 800,000 second vaccinations in June and more than 1,000,000 first vaccinations one day in May, the German vaccination campaign is only showing slow progress. For instance, the number of second vaccinations declined in October this year to roughly 50,000 and the so-called booster vaccinations show numbers that are only marginally higher (RKI 2021). At the same time, the daily number of infections is rising rapidly again. In order to that, it seems more urgent than ever before to distribute as many vaccines as possible.

Positive examples like the one of Portugal show that it is indeed possible to vaccinate the majority of the people to prevent the so-called fourth wave of infections. In Portugal, more than 80% are already vaccinated (WHO 2021) and the disease’s spreading speed is comparably low. In contrast, the German share of fully vaccinated people is at under 70% at the beginning of November with some federal states like the Free State of Saxony not even having a share of 60% (RKI 2021).

How could it be possible, to vaccinate also enough German people to arrive at the famous herd immunity? Will the so-called 2G-regulations (Access for vaccinated (“Geimpft”) and fully recovered (“Genesen”) people only) be useful to achieve that aim? How can anti-vaccinationists be convinced if they do not rely on public information and mistrust science in general? Or is designing further incentives to getting vaccinated rather the key to success? First tries used sausages or drinks for free, and shopping gift cards, inter alia. But how can we set the general vaccination incentives so that even the last third of the German population can be convinced to getting vaccinated? Students are asked to develop creative and promising ideas that can help to accomplish the “project 100%”.

Sources:
RKI. 2021. Tabelle mit den gemeldeten Impfungen nach Bundesländern und Impfquote nach Altersgruppen. Last access on 10.11.2021 at: https://bit.ly/3nh3oID
WHO. 2021. WHO Coronavirus (COVID-19) Dashboard. Last access on 10.11.2021 at: https://covid19.who.int/

Must-Read: Das Team sollte folgendes vor dem Kick-Off gelesen haben:

Die ECDC (2021) bietet eine Übersicht dazu, was Menschen daran hindern kann, Impfungen in Anspruch zu nehmen, was getan werden kann, um hierbei zu helfen und welche Maßnahmen bislang in Europa verabschiedet wurden. Abrufbar unter: https://bit.ly/3D46C7U

Zusätzliche Literatur:

Campos-Mercade et al. (2021) bieten ein Beispiel dafür, wie finanzielle Anreize die Impfbereitschaft erhöhen können. Abrufbar unter: https://bit.ly/30eBqoh

Dai et al. (2021) haben ein weiteres Beispiel, das zeigt, dass Nudges wie Erinnerungsnachrichten die Impfbereitschaft ebenfalls erhöhen können. Abrufbar unter: https://go.nature.com/3ogWH8R

Das Impfquotenmonitoring des RKI (2021) bietet immer aktuelle Übersichten zum Impffortschritt in Deutschland, Aktuelle Version Stand Mitte November abrufbar unter https://bit.ly/3oyoNwe

Scientific Partner

Supporting Researchers

Rika Stoczek

Photo: (c) Christian Wyrwa

Rika Stoczek is a research assistant at the Institute for Economic Policy at Leibniz Universität Hannover. She previously completed her Bachelor’s degree in Economics at the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster and her Master’s degree in Economics at the University of Cologne. She also worked as a student trainee at the Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft. Since August 2021, she has been doing her doctorate at the Chair of Innovation Economics on empirical and experimental topics in behavioural and innovation economics.

Kevin Piehl

Foto: (c) Christian Wyrwa

Kevin Piehl is a research assistant at the Institute for Economic Policy at Leibniz Universität Hannover. Previously, he studied economics in the Bachelor’s and Master’s programmes, also at Leibniz Universität Hannover, and dealt with the Corona crisis at the beginning of the year with his Master’s thesis „Does the Economy Learn to Cope with Pandemics?“. Since July 2021, he has been doing his doctorate at the Chair of Innovation Economics on empirical and experimental topics in behavioural and innovation economics, among others.