Partner

RWI – Leibniz Institute for Economic Research2018-12-19T15:58:14+02:00

RWI – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung

Das RWI ist Partner des YES! – Young Economic Summit seit 2018.

Das RWI – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung ist eines der führenden Zentren für wissenschaftliche Forschung und evidenzbasierte Politikberatung in Deutschland und Mitglied der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft.

Wirtschaft geht jeden etwas an: Im RWI – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung erforschen Wissenschaftler, was warum und mit welchen Folgen für den Einzelnen und die Gesellschaft in der Wirtschaft passiert. Das Institut unterstützt mit diesen Forschungen die Politik, liefert wichtige Grundlagen für deren Entscheidungen und bewertet politische Maßnahmen. Dazu forscht das RWI in allen Ebenen – vom Individuum bis zur Weltwirtschaft – in vier Kompetenzbereichen: „Arbeitsmärkte, Bildung, Bevölkerung“, „Gesundheit“, „Umwelt und Ressourcen“ sowie „Wachstum, Konjunktur, Öffentliche Finanzen“. Das „FDZ Ruhr am RWI“ versorgt die Wissenschaftler mit aktuellsten Zahlen. Zudem möchte das RWI als öffentlich finanziertes Forschungsinstitut wirtschaftliche Zusammenhänge verständlich der Öffentlichkeit vermitteln – damit jeder Wirtschaft versteht.

Das RWI im Internet und Social Web

Homepage: www.rwi-essen.de

Twitter: @RWI_Essen

Facebook: @RWI.Essen

Flickr: RWI_Essen

RWI – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung

Das RWI ist Partner des YES! – Young Economic Summit seit 2018.

Das RWI – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung ist eines der führenden Zentren für wissenschaftliche Forschung und evidenzbasierte Politikberatung in Deutschland und Mitglied der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft.

Wirtschaft geht jeden etwas an: Im RWI – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung erforschen Wissenschaftler, was warum und mit welchen Folgen für den Einzelnen und die Gesellschaft in der Wirtschaft passiert. Das Institut unterstützt mit diesen Forschungen die Politik, liefert wichtige Grundlagen für deren Entscheidungen und bewertet politische Maßnahmen. Dazu forscht das RWI in allen Ebenen – vom Individuum bis zur Weltwirtschaft – in vier Kompetenzbereichen: „Arbeitsmärkte, Bildung, Bevölkerung“, „Gesundheit“, „Umwelt und Ressourcen“ sowie „Wachstum, Konjunktur, Öffentliche Finanzen“. Das „FDZ Ruhr am RWI“ versorgt die Wissenschaftler mit aktuellsten Zahlen. Zudem möchte das RWI als öffentlich finanziertes Forschungsinstitut wirtschaftliche Zusammenhänge verständlich der Öffentlichkeit vermitteln – damit jeder Wirtschaft versteht.

Das RWI im Internet und Social Web

Homepage: www.rwi-essen.de

Twitter: @RWI_Essen

Facebook: @RWI.Essen

Flickr: RWI_Essen

RWI-Themen für das YES! 2019

Forschende am RWI und Teilnehmer am YES!

Malvern College (2019)

UK guest team

SWIGE – Saving the gig economy

The gig economy is revolutionizing the workplace.  In a world where people want flexible jobs that allow them to work freely, and spontaneously, having the opportunity to be an Uber driver or a Deliveroo biker represents an incredibly attractive option.  However there are nonetheless many problems related to this, ranging from basic workers’ rights that are not being provided to the unstable wages that make it seem impossible for workers to save.  To save, however, is crucial for a stable future: without saving these workers will not be able to live a life free from constant worry and they will be unable to face any of the unexpected curveballs that life can throw.

As young students, we worry about the future of our generation, and what the gig economy might mean for us.  We are therefore creating an app called Swige (Saving for Workers In the Gig Economy), that will not only persuade young gig workers that saving is convenient but will also make it easier for them to do so.  Initially this app will be distributed by the government to gig firms.  Each gig worker can be signed up for an account on the app that will be directly connected to their bank accounts.  Through a variety of behavioural economics tools (gamification, opt-out, providing limited choices), the app encourages and enables individuals to save, even when their income might be irregular and unpredictable.

Our future is precious, and we want our app to save it.

The gender pay gap

A gap between the earnings of women and men is a pervasive problem across all countries. Although many countries have explicitly outlawed unequal pay, it remains the case that men out-earn women – by an average of 15 per cent across OECD countries. This has implications for individual outcomes; for example, women face a greater risk of poverty in old age. It also has macro-economic consequences to the extent that the best use is not made of women’s talent in the economy.

The gender pay gap is seen as arising as a result of several factors.

One is occupational segregation, i.e. the fact that men and women are often concentrated in different occupations with different levels of pay; engineers are overwhelmingly male, for example, while nurses are predominantly female.

A second key factor is childcare. Women typically take more responsibility for childcare, and the gender pay gap becomes more pronounced after the arrival of a woman’s first child.

Some see occupational choice and childcare as individual choices and argue that the gender pay gap is not a matter for public policy concern. But individual choices are shaped by social norms e.g. expectations about who should take responsibility for children and whether women should combine work and childcare.

The idea that social norms matter for the gender pay gap is reinforced by a growing body of research evidence that gender norms affect how men and women are treated in the workplace. Hypothetical male and female candidates with identical CVs are perceived in a different way, for example, indicating that men and women are not treated equally.

Policies to deal with the gender pay gap should take account of these underlying causes – dealing with the consequences of childcare, for example, and also tackling underlying social norms around gender.

Mind the Gap” by Pawel Loj is licensed under CC BY 2.0

In cooperation with the Department of Economics at the University of Bristol

Author of the topic: Prof. Sarah Smith, Ph.D.

The rise of the online gig: How can policy and the labour market adapt to modern gig work?

The rise of online platforms and apps means the nature of work is changing for many. Although the majority of workers in the UK are traditional employees, increasing numbers are turning to the gig economy, using widely accessible technology to reduce search frictions and connect workers with clients. Uber and Deliveroo are now household names, but the gig economy goes beyond transport and delivery services alone; performers, programmers, plumbers and proofreaders can all be found on the array of specialist platforms. Such arrangements offer flexibility to both firms and workers: workers can choose when and where to work, while firms can adapt their labour force to changing business needs. At the same time the instability of irregular employment can jeopardise workers’ ability to save, build a pension and cope with income shocks. Workers are not entitled to holiday pay or sick pay and can often work alone for extended periods of time. The UK government also faces lower tax revenue as a result of increased self-employment and firms lack incentives to invest in and train their workforce.

Is the gig economy a recent fad, or does it represent the future of work for many? Do the benefits outweigh the costs for workers, firms and government? Can the situation be improved for all parties? Does the gig economy feed inequality or does it help reduce it? Are the young more or less vulnerable to the gig economy than others? Can a country solve these problems alone or does it require wider cooperation? Do solutions lie in policy, technology or elsewhere?

Good Work: The Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices,  (2017)

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/627671/good-work-taylor-review-modern-working-practices-rg.pdf

HM Government, The experiences of individuals in the gig economy (2018)

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679987/171107_The_experiences_of_those_in_the_gig_economy.pdf

Adam, Miller and Pope (IFS), The IFS Green Budget: Tax, legal form and the gig economy (2017)

https://www.ifs.org.uk/uploads/publications/comms/R124_Green%20Budget_7.%20Tax%2C%20legal%20form%20and%20gig%20economy.pdf

Eichhorst, Hinte, Rinne and Tobsche (IZA), How big is the gig?: Assessing the Preliminary Evidence on the Effects of Digitalization on the Labour Market

http://ftp.iza.org/pp117.pdf

Gig Working” by Abhijit Bhaduri is licensed under CC BY 2.0

In cooperation with the Department of Economics at the University of Bristol

Author of the topic: Dr. Annika Johnson

Malvern College (2019)

UK guest team

SWIGE – Saving the gig economy

The gig economy is revolutionizing the workplace.  In a world where people want flexible jobs that allow them to work freely, and spontaneously, having the opportunity to be an Uber driver or a Deliveroo biker represents an incredibly attractive option.  However there are nonetheless many problems related to this, ranging from basic workers’ rights that are not being provided to the unstable wages that make it seem impossible for workers to save.  To save, however, is crucial for a stable future: without saving these workers will not be able to live a life free from constant worry and they will be unable to face any of the unexpected curveballs that life can throw.

As young students, we worry about the future of our generation, and what the gig economy might mean for us.  We are therefore creating an app called Swige (Saving for Workers In the Gig Economy), that will not only persuade young gig workers that saving is convenient but will also make it easier for them to do so.  Initially this app will be distributed by the government to gig firms.  Each gig worker can be signed up for an account on the app that will be directly connected to their bank accounts.  Through a variety of behavioural economics tools (gamification, opt-out, providing limited choices), the app encourages and enables individuals to save, even when their income might be irregular and unpredictable.

Our future is precious, and we want our app to save it.

The gender pay gap

A gap between the earnings of women and men is a pervasive problem across all countries. Although many countries have explicitly outlawed unequal pay, it remains the case that men out-earn women – by an average of 15 per cent across OECD countries. This has implications for individual outcomes; for example, women face a greater risk of poverty in old age. It also has macro-economic consequences to the extent that the best use is not made of women’s talent in the economy.

The gender pay gap is seen as arising as a result of several factors.

One is occupational segregation, i.e. the fact that men and women are often concentrated in different occupations with different levels of pay; engineers are overwhelmingly male, for example, while nurses are predominantly female.

A second key factor is childcare. Women typically take more responsibility for childcare, and the gender pay gap becomes more pronounced after the arrival of a woman’s first child.

Some see occupational choice and childcare as individual choices and argue that the gender pay gap is not a matter for public policy concern. But individual choices are shaped by social norms e.g. expectations about who should take responsibility for children and whether women should combine work and childcare.

The idea that social norms matter for the gender pay gap is reinforced by a growing body of research evidence that gender norms affect how men and women are treated in the workplace. Hypothetical male and female candidates with identical CVs are perceived in a different way, for example, indicating that men and women are not treated equally.

Policies to deal with the gender pay gap should take account of these underlying causes – dealing with the consequences of childcare, for example, and also tackling underlying social norms around gender.

Mind the Gap” by Pawel Loj is licensed under CC BY 2.0

In cooperation with the Department of Economics at the University of Bristol

Author of the topic: Prof. Sarah Smith, Ph.D.

The rise of the online gig: How can policy and the labour market adapt to modern gig work?

The rise of online platforms and apps means the nature of work is changing for many. Although the majority of workers in the UK are traditional employees, increasing numbers are turning to the gig economy, using widely accessible technology to reduce search frictions and connect workers with clients. Uber and Deliveroo are now household names, but the gig economy goes beyond transport and delivery services alone; performers, programmers, plumbers and proofreaders can all be found on the array of specialist platforms. Such arrangements offer flexibility to both firms and workers: workers can choose when and where to work, while firms can adapt their labour force to changing business needs. At the same time the instability of irregular employment can jeopardise workers’ ability to save, build a pension and cope with income shocks. Workers are not entitled to holiday pay or sick pay and can often work alone for extended periods of time. The UK government also faces lower tax revenue as a result of increased self-employment and firms lack incentives to invest in and train their workforce.

Is the gig economy a recent fad, or does it represent the future of work for many? Do the benefits outweigh the costs for workers, firms and government? Can the situation be improved for all parties? Does the gig economy feed inequality or does it help reduce it? Are the young more or less vulnerable to the gig economy than others? Can a country solve these problems alone or does it require wider cooperation? Do solutions lie in policy, technology or elsewhere?

Good Work: The Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices,  (2017)

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/627671/good-work-taylor-review-modern-working-practices-rg.pdf

HM Government, The experiences of individuals in the gig economy (2018)

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679987/171107_The_experiences_of_those_in_the_gig_economy.pdf

Adam, Miller and Pope (IFS), The IFS Green Budget: Tax, legal form and the gig economy (2017)

https://www.ifs.org.uk/uploads/publications/comms/R124_Green%20Budget_7.%20Tax%2C%20legal%20form%20and%20gig%20economy.pdf

Eichhorst, Hinte, Rinne and Tobsche (IZA), How big is the gig?: Assessing the Preliminary Evidence on the Effects of Digitalization on the Labour Market

http://ftp.iza.org/pp117.pdf

Gig Working” by Abhijit Bhaduri is licensed under CC BY 2.0

In cooperation with the Department of Economics at the University of Bristol

Author of the topic: Dr. Annika Johnson

Malvern College (2019)

UK guest team

SWIGE – Saving the gig economy

The gig economy is revolutionizing the workplace.  In a world where people want flexible jobs that allow them to work freely, and spontaneously, having the opportunity to be an Uber driver or a Deliveroo biker represents an incredibly attractive option.  However there are nonetheless many problems related to this, ranging from basic workers’ rights that are not being provided to the unstable wages that make it seem impossible for workers to save.  To save, however, is crucial for a stable future: without saving these workers will not be able to live a life free from constant worry and they will be unable to face any of the unexpected curveballs that life can throw.

As young students, we worry about the future of our generation, and what the gig economy might mean for us.  We are therefore creating an app called Swige (Saving for Workers In the Gig Economy), that will not only persuade young gig workers that saving is convenient but will also make it easier for them to do so.  Initially this app will be distributed by the government to gig firms.  Each gig worker can be signed up for an account on the app that will be directly connected to their bank accounts.  Through a variety of behavioural economics tools (gamification, opt-out, providing limited choices), the app encourages and enables individuals to save, even when their income might be irregular and unpredictable.

Our future is precious, and we want our app to save it.

The gender pay gap

A gap between the earnings of women and men is a pervasive problem across all countries. Although many countries have explicitly outlawed unequal pay, it remains the case that men out-earn women – by an average of 15 per cent across OECD countries. This has implications for individual outcomes; for example, women face a greater risk of poverty in old age. It also has macro-economic consequences to the extent that the best use is not made of women’s talent in the economy.

The gender pay gap is seen as arising as a result of several factors.

One is occupational segregation, i.e. the fact that men and women are often concentrated in different occupations with different levels of pay; engineers are overwhelmingly male, for example, while nurses are predominantly female.

A second key factor is childcare. Women typically take more responsibility for childcare, and the gender pay gap becomes more pronounced after the arrival of a woman’s first child.

Some see occupational choice and childcare as individual choices and argue that the gender pay gap is not a matter for public policy concern. But individual choices are shaped by social norms e.g. expectations about who should take responsibility for children and whether women should combine work and childcare.

The idea that social norms matter for the gender pay gap is reinforced by a growing body of research evidence that gender norms affect how men and women are treated in the workplace. Hypothetical male and female candidates with identical CVs are perceived in a different way, for example, indicating that men and women are not treated equally.

Policies to deal with the gender pay gap should take account of these underlying causes – dealing with the consequences of childcare, for example, and also tackling underlying social norms around gender.

Mind the Gap” by Pawel Loj is licensed under CC BY 2.0

In cooperation with the Department of Economics at the University of Bristol

Author of the topic: Prof. Sarah Smith, Ph.D.

The rise of the online gig: How can policy and the labour market adapt to modern gig work?

The rise of online platforms and apps means the nature of work is changing for many. Although the majority of workers in the UK are traditional employees, increasing numbers are turning to the gig economy, using widely accessible technology to reduce search frictions and connect workers with clients. Uber and Deliveroo are now household names, but the gig economy goes beyond transport and delivery services alone; performers, programmers, plumbers and proofreaders can all be found on the array of specialist platforms. Such arrangements offer flexibility to both firms and workers: workers can choose when and where to work, while firms can adapt their labour force to changing business needs. At the same time the instability of irregular employment can jeopardise workers’ ability to save, build a pension and cope with income shocks. Workers are not entitled to holiday pay or sick pay and can often work alone for extended periods of time. The UK government also faces lower tax revenue as a result of increased self-employment and firms lack incentives to invest in and train their workforce.

Is the gig economy a recent fad, or does it represent the future of work for many? Do the benefits outweigh the costs for workers, firms and government? Can the situation be improved for all parties? Does the gig economy feed inequality or does it help reduce it? Are the young more or less vulnerable to the gig economy than others? Can a country solve these problems alone or does it require wider cooperation? Do solutions lie in policy, technology or elsewhere?

Good Work: The Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices,  (2017)

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/627671/good-work-taylor-review-modern-working-practices-rg.pdf

HM Government, The experiences of individuals in the gig economy (2018)

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679987/171107_The_experiences_of_those_in_the_gig_economy.pdf

Adam, Miller and Pope (IFS), The IFS Green Budget: Tax, legal form and the gig economy (2017)

https://www.ifs.org.uk/uploads/publications/comms/R124_Green%20Budget_7.%20Tax%2C%20legal%20form%20and%20gig%20economy.pdf

Eichhorst, Hinte, Rinne and Tobsche (IZA), How big is the gig?: Assessing the Preliminary Evidence on the Effects of Digitalization on the Labour Market

http://ftp.iza.org/pp117.pdf

Gig Working” by Abhijit Bhaduri is licensed under CC BY 2.0

In cooperation with the Department of Economics at the University of Bristol

Author of the topic: Dr. Annika Johnson

Malvern College (2019)

UK guest team

SWIGE – Saving the gig economy

The gig economy is revolutionizing the workplace.  In a world where people want flexible jobs that allow them to work freely, and spontaneously, having the opportunity to be an Uber driver or a Deliveroo biker represents an incredibly attractive option.  However there are nonetheless many problems related to this, ranging from basic workers’ rights that are not being provided to the unstable wages that make it seem impossible for workers to save.  To save, however, is crucial for a stable future: without saving these workers will not be able to live a life free from constant worry and they will be unable to face any of the unexpected curveballs that life can throw.

As young students, we worry about the future of our generation, and what the gig economy might mean for us.  We are therefore creating an app called Swige (Saving for Workers In the Gig Economy), that will not only persuade young gig workers that saving is convenient but will also make it easier for them to do so.  Initially this app will be distributed by the government to gig firms.  Each gig worker can be signed up for an account on the app that will be directly connected to their bank accounts.  Through a variety of behavioural economics tools (gamification, opt-out, providing limited choices), the app encourages and enables individuals to save, even when their income might be irregular and unpredictable.

Our future is precious, and we want our app to save it.

The gender pay gap

A gap between the earnings of women and men is a pervasive problem across all countries. Although many countries have explicitly outlawed unequal pay, it remains the case that men out-earn women – by an average of 15 per cent across OECD countries. This has implications for individual outcomes; for example, women face a greater risk of poverty in old age. It also has macro-economic consequences to the extent that the best use is not made of women’s talent in the economy.

The gender pay gap is seen as arising as a result of several factors.

One is occupational segregation, i.e. the fact that men and women are often concentrated in different occupations with different levels of pay; engineers are overwhelmingly male, for example, while nurses are predominantly female.

A second key factor is childcare. Women typically take more responsibility for childcare, and the gender pay gap becomes more pronounced after the arrival of a woman’s first child.

Some see occupational choice and childcare as individual choices and argue that the gender pay gap is not a matter for public policy concern. But individual choices are shaped by social norms e.g. expectations about who should take responsibility for children and whether women should combine work and childcare.

The idea that social norms matter for the gender pay gap is reinforced by a growing body of research evidence that gender norms affect how men and women are treated in the workplace. Hypothetical male and female candidates with identical CVs are perceived in a different way, for example, indicating that men and women are not treated equally.

Policies to deal with the gender pay gap should take account of these underlying causes – dealing with the consequences of childcare, for example, and also tackling underlying social norms around gender.

Mind the Gap” by Pawel Loj is licensed under CC BY 2.0

In cooperation with the Department of Economics at the University of Bristol

Author of the topic: Prof. Sarah Smith, Ph.D.

The rise of the online gig: How can policy and the labour market adapt to modern gig work?

The rise of online platforms and apps means the nature of work is changing for many. Although the majority of workers in the UK are traditional employees, increasing numbers are turning to the gig economy, using widely accessible technology to reduce search frictions and connect workers with clients. Uber and Deliveroo are now household names, but the gig economy goes beyond transport and delivery services alone; performers, programmers, plumbers and proofreaders can all be found on the array of specialist platforms. Such arrangements offer flexibility to both firms and workers: workers can choose when and where to work, while firms can adapt their labour force to changing business needs. At the same time the instability of irregular employment can jeopardise workers’ ability to save, build a pension and cope with income shocks. Workers are not entitled to holiday pay or sick pay and can often work alone for extended periods of time. The UK government also faces lower tax revenue as a result of increased self-employment and firms lack incentives to invest in and train their workforce.

Is the gig economy a recent fad, or does it represent the future of work for many? Do the benefits outweigh the costs for workers, firms and government? Can the situation be improved for all parties? Does the gig economy feed inequality or does it help reduce it? Are the young more or less vulnerable to the gig economy than others? Can a country solve these problems alone or does it require wider cooperation? Do solutions lie in policy, technology or elsewhere?

Good Work: The Taylor Review of Modern Working Practices,  (2017)

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/627671/good-work-taylor-review-modern-working-practices-rg.pdf

HM Government, The experiences of individuals in the gig economy (2018)

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679987/171107_The_experiences_of_those_in_the_gig_economy.pdf

Adam, Miller and Pope (IFS), The IFS Green Budget: Tax, legal form and the gig economy (2017)

https://www.ifs.org.uk/uploads/publications/comms/R124_Green%20Budget_7.%20Tax%2C%20legal%20form%20and%20gig%20economy.pdf

Eichhorst, Hinte, Rinne and Tobsche (IZA), How big is the gig?: Assessing the Preliminary Evidence on the Effects of Digitalization on the Labour Market

http://ftp.iza.org/pp117.pdf

Gig Working” by Abhijit Bhaduri is licensed under CC BY 2.0

In cooperation with the Department of Economics at the University of Bristol

Author of the topic: Dr. Annika Johnson